Charting Stacks

RedMonk Language Rankings Over Time

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Update: March 19th – there was a typo in our initial data scrape, and Python v’s PHP were in the wrong positions for 2018. Updated now.

Following our twitter chat yesterday on the latest RedMonk Language Rankings I created a visualisation to highlight relative movements over time (large version). For a more detailed discussion on the most recent rankings please refer to Stephen O’Grady’s write up.

The most striking aspect is just how stable the top ten languages are. This reflects the investment people make in learning a language and the reality that shifts in the languages that businesses use to develop software happens slowly.

Other aspects that stand out are the rapid decline in Perl, the stabilisation of Ruby and the ascent of Swift. But sometimes a picture is worth a thousand words.

4 comments

  1. […] etc. over the last five to 10 years, we still largely use the same languages. Redmonk analyst Fintan Ryan has visualized this consistency […]

  2. […] firm RedMonk recently visualized its programming-language rankings from 2012 through 2018, and concluded that certain languages remain remarkably stable over the long […]

  3. […] However not everyone seems to be blissful. The recognition of the Ruby language has been bolstered for a few years by the success of the Ruby on Rails (RoR) net software framework which dominated the net scene, notably amongst startups who wished one thing that take care of a lot of the heavy lifting. That dominant uplift noticed Ruby soar to fifth place within the RedMonk Language Rankings in 2012, which makes use of a mixture GitHub and Stack Overflow language rankings to evaluate a language’s recognition, [since then it’s drifted down to eighth]. […]

  4. […] tools and its Swift programming language. Apple introduced Swift in 2014, and it’s rocketed up the charts as programmers adopted Swift for writing iOS apps and […]

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