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Three Weeks Without Blogging Is Too Long: New Service level

I got an email from an old chum today asking: “Are you alright? 3 weeks without blogging is too long”.

Ian – you’re absolutely right. Its very clear that like many others a lot of the stuff i once would have blogged is now getting twittered instead. Twitter is where much of the conversation is, but Monkchips The Blog is an important part of my conversation with the market and I have been neglecting it.

I am therefore now announcing a new service level – I will now create a least two posts a week. I am also going to think about ways to harvest some of the twitter juice and use it here.

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15 Responses

  1. Are there any methods to stick tweets into draft blog posts for, say, Blogger or WordPress? Would be great to come back to tweets and expand upon them at a slightly later point. Or maybe Friendfeed is a better way of doing this…

  2. James, you could just post some of the twitter conversations with additional narrative. While many of us follow you, we don’t follow everyone in the conversation.

    What at the time might seem like an uncoordinated missive, laters turns into an interesting twittervation, but we’ve lost the context, and ultimately the conversation.

  3. Good to see even the Pro’s are struggling with this!

    And my blog posts were sparse enough to begin with!

    Will be interested to hear what you come up with re “harvesting some of the twitter juice”.

  4. As a twitter user, you twitter too much to really consume daily. More organized blog posts are much more consumption friendly IMO :-)

  5. I’ve noticed that I end up “blogging” on Twitter a lot lately too. But actually posting pays a little better!

  6. James-

    First you talk me into blogging, then you give me a crisis of confidence (http://alignment.wordpress.com/2007/12/09/am-i-a-blogger/), and now you establish an SLA for your blog? Don’t you know by now that an arbitrary metric won’t cut it? ;-)

  7. i was wondering what had happenend to you, both Cote and Stephen have seemed to keep some level of posting up (alright a lot is just Del.icio.us links but still …)

    +1 on Mark Cathcart’s suggestion of posting a summary of the weeks most interesting “conversations” you have taken part in on twitter
    sorry, but i just don’t get how conversations work on Twitter, far too hard, or i am always searching for the next tool to do it.
    Jaiku has conversations, and also Friendfeed. I get that “everyone” is on twitter, so you need to be there as part of a career, but i don’t see the conversation thing.

  8. Twitter is great, but blogs often reflect deeper thought. I’m glad for your quota. I’ve given myself a blog quota as well (mine is 3x/week), after letting it languish for a long, long time. Wish me luck staying on the blog wagon this time!

  9. All of these mediums are layers of communication. Nothing beats f2f. We often settle for a phone discussion. But sometimes all we get is email. More timely is IM…Twitter is some hybrid of all of these, but does not replace any of them. A single, well thought out, well written piece is worth a year’s worth of tweets in my opinion.

    Teressa JimenezFebruary 27, 2009 @ 10:08 pmReply



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